The American version of Big Brother has aired on CBS every summer since 2000. It is a reality show in which a number of strangers live in an isolated house and compete to win a cash prize. The series is taken from Endemol's popular Big Brother format, and is produced by Endemol USA. The show is executive-produced currently by Arnold Shapiro (who formerly produced Rescue 911) and Alison Grodner.

Since its second season, the American Big Brother uses different rules than other countries' versions of the show. In the U.S. version, viewers do not vote for eviction; all voting is done by houseguests. There have been six complete seasons of the U.S. version of the show, with a seventh season currently underway; all have been broadcast on CBS.

For all seasons the eviction-night host has been Julie Chen, wife of CBS President Les Moonves and co-host of the network's The Early Show. In the first season (2000), Chen was widely ridiculed in the media for her wooden delivery, stilted interaction with the studio audience, weak interviews with evictees on the live programs, and her overuse of the phrase "But first..." The continuity announcer for the first five seasons was Phil Proctor. He played an active role in the first season introducing every scene, but with the major changes to the program after the initial series, he was relegated to the opening and closing of each episode. For season six, Proctor was replaced by Clayton Halsey. This decision was made so late, Proctor had already toured the new set.

The weekly live show was substantially changed after the first season. Originally, the live show featured a studio audience along with guest commentators Dr. Drew Pinsky, best known for Loveline on MTV, and (sponsor) America Online "Internet Advisor" Regina Lewis. Julie Chen now presents the live eviction show from an empty studio overlooking the entrance to the house.

Big Brother USA season 7, currently broadcast in the United States as part of the Big Brother reality television series, airs on CBS and started on July 6, 2006.[1] Julie Chen continues as host of this season as she has in all previous seasons. CBS aired a preview episode on June 21, 2006, offering twenty former contestants from past seasons as candidates for the this season.[1] After the preview show, internet voting opened to the public with the promise that the top six vote getters would enter the house and another six would be chosen by the producers. On the first episode, Julie Chen announced that due to the high volume of voting, CBS decided to admit the top four male and top four female vote-getters, as well as six producer-chosen contestants, bringing the total cast from twelve to fourteen. The premiere episode scored 7.69 million viewers, down from last year's average for the show.

The competition will be similar to the recent prior seasons, with Head of Household (HoH) and Golden Power of Veto competitions, houseguests being nominated for eviction, and one member of the cast being voted out of the house by his remaining peers each week. An early twist, announced on the premiere show, is the double HoH position. Also, host Julie Chen has started to refer to the contestants as housemates, rather than in previous seasons, in which she called them houseguests. The last remaining houseguest will win $500,000. The runner-up will receive $50,000.

Companion internet talk show House Calls has been renewed for this season. Because former co-anchor Marcellas Reynolds is currently in the house, host Gretchen Massey now hosts the show with a new guest each week. Each Friday, the evicted houseguest appears on the show (they are required to by their contract). Similar to earlier seasons of the show, 24/7 feeds are available for a small fee on CBS' webpage.

Home | Site Map | Links

Copyright © bigbrotherfansite.com

Big Brother
Big Brother
Big Brother
Big Brother
Big Brother
Big Brother
Big Brother Big Brother